Bibliography

American Memory. “The Gramophone.” Library of Congress. http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/berlhtml/berlgramo.html (accessed April 20, 2013).

American Memory. “The History of the Edison Cylinder Phonograph.” Library of Congress. http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/edhtml/edcyldr.html (accessed April 18, 2013).

Chavez, Carlos. Toward a New Music: Music and Electricity. New York: Da Capo Press,    1975.

Coleman, Mark. Playback: From The Victrola to MP3, 1OO Years of Music, Machines, and Money. Cambridge, MA: Da Capo Press, 2003.

“Columbia to Defend Long Playing Record.” New York Times, February 10, 1950. (accessed March 27, 2013).

Crews, Andrew D. From Poulsen to Plastic: A Survey of Recordable Magnetic Media, University of Texas, 2003 https://www.ischool.utexas.edu/~cochinea/html-paper/a-crews-03-magnetic-media.html, (accessed March, 25, 2013).

Dell, Kristina. “Vinyl Gets its Groove Back.” Time Magazine, January 10, 2008. (March 27, 2013).

Farhi, Paul. “Compact Discs Turn Tables On Vinyl Record Sales: CD’s Popularity Surprising Industry.” The Washington Post, March 1, 1989. (accessed March 26, 2013).

Gelatt, Roland. The Fabulous Phonograph, From Tin Foil to High Fidelity. Philidelphia: J.B. Lippincott Co., 1954.

Grubbs, David. “Remove the Records from Texas: Parsing Online Archives.” American Music Review 40, no. 2. (Spring 2011): 1-14. Academic Search Complete. EBSCOhost. (accessed March 21, 2013).

Hochman, Steve. “Will Those Vinyl Records Be All Played Out by 1990?” Los Angeles Times, October 8, 1988. (March 26, 2013).

Hume, Paul. “45-minute Record Means Great Savings.” Washington Post, June 27, 1948. http://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.umw.edu/hnpwashingtonpost/docview/152055898/13D97A5456931A382D2/1?accountid=12299 (accessed April 22, 2013).

Hume, Paul. “Those ‘LP’ Records Are Here to Stay.” Washington Post, October 8, 1950. (March 27, 2013).

Lanster, Mark, 45 RPM, Princeton Architectural Press, 2002.

“Long Playing Records Aid Youngsters: Agency Will Give Children Help.” Chicago Daily Tribune, December 4, 1960. (accessed April 17, 2013).

“Long Playing Records Train Sales Workers.” New York Times, April 1, 1962. (accessed April 27, 2013).

Millard, Andre. America on Record: A History of Recorded Sound. 2nd ed. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2005.

Morton, David, Recording History, http://www.recording-history.org/HTML/8track5.php (accessed March 25, 2013).

Morton, David L., Jr. Sound Recording: The Life Story of a Technology. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 2004.

“Record Plays for 45 minutes.” Washington Post, June 21, 1948.

Schoenherr, Steven E. “Charles Sumner Tainter and the Graphophone.” Auido Engineering Society. http://www.aes.org/aeshc/docs/recording.technology.history/graphophone.html#group08 (accessed April 20, 2013).

Schoenherr, Steven E., The History of Magnetic Recording, http://www.aes.org/aeshc/docs/recording.technology.history/magnetic4.html , University of San Diego, 2002 (accessed 3/25/2013).

Sear, Walter. The New World of Electronic Music. New York: Alfred Publishing Co., 1972.

Smith, Delos. “Long-Playing Record Called Great Advance for Home Music.” Washington Post, October 10, 1948. http://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.umw.edu/hnpwashingtonpost/docview/152043404/13D97A29D7B7D3813F9/1?accountid=12299 (accessed April 22, 2013).

Thill, Scott. “June 21, 1948: Columbia’s Microgroove LP Makes Albums Sound Good.” Wired.com. http://www.wired.com/thisdayintech/2010/06/0621first-lp-released/. (accessed March 26, 2013).

Wilentz, Sean. 360 Sound: The Columbia Records Story. San Francisco: Chronicle Books, 2012.

Media/Images (in order of appearance)

Home

Header

Pederson, Erik. “LP Record.” “Has the Music Business Turned A Corner? RIAA Reports First Revenue Increase in 7 years.” The Hollywood Reporter, March 28, 2012. http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/music-business-riaa-sales-gains-305465 (accessed March 27, 2013).

Video

RCA Victor, “Living Stereo.” 1958. Posted by Youtube user Jeff Quitney. “Vinyl Records: How Stereo LPs Work: “‘Living Stereo'” 1958 RCA. Youtube.  Uploaded December 19, 2011. Original from Library of Congress Prelinger Archive. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jq2sjGFvNnM (accessed March 27, 2013).

Antecedents

Edison, Thomas A. “Edison with Cylinder Phonograph; Washington, DC: April 18, 1878.” 1878. Photo courtesy of U.S. Department of Interior, National Park Service, Edison National Historic Site. Posted by American’s Story, Library of Congress. http://www.americaslibrary.gov/aa/edison/aa_edison_phonograph_1_e.html  (accessed March 12, 2013).

Edison Brown Wax Cylinders.”Three minutes with the minstrels / Arthur Collins, S. H. Dudley and Ancient City.”1899. Photo courtesy of Department of Special Collections, Donald C. Davidson Library, University of California, Santa Barbara. http://cylinders.library.ucsb.edu/history-brownwax.php (accessed March 27, 2013).

“Emile Berliner in laboratory working on gramophone disc.” Photo courtesy of American Memory at the Library of Congress. Credit Line Rice Montreal. http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/r?ammem/AMALL:@field(NUMBER+@band(berlp+12010112 (accessed March 25, 2013).

Wolters, Dick.”Record players matching the three types of records available in 1949.” Photo courtesy of Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.
http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2002716587/ (accessed March 27, 2013).

Invention

“Peter Carl Goldmark.” The Biography Channel website. http://www.biography.com/people/peter-goldmark-9314604 (accessed March 26, 2013).

Henry, Libby. “Columbia LP record player.” March 22, 2013.

Possible Alternatives

How is sound recorded on motion picture film? http://www.howstuffworks.com/question413.htm, How Stuff Works (accessed March 27, 2013).

Crews, Andrew D. From Poulsen to Plastic: A Survey of Recordable Magnetic Media, University of Texas, 2003 https://www.ischool.utexas.edu/~cochinea/html-paper/a-crews-03-magnetic-media.html, (accessed March 25, 2013).

Morton, David, Recording History, http://www.recording-history.org/HTML/8track5.php (accessed March 25, 2013).

Crews, Andrew D. From Poulsen to Plastic: A Survey of Recordable Magnetic Media, University of Texas, 2003 https://www.ischool.utexas.edu/~cochinea/html-paper/a-crews-03-magnetic-media.html, (accessed March 25, 2013).

RCA Victor, “1949 Preview” 1949 Posted by Youtube user verycoolsound. “RCA Victor’s 1949 Preview of the World’s First 45 rpm Records!” 1949 RCA. Youtube.  Uploaded September 18, 2009, http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=ebRx7FN6vlc (accessed March 25, 2013).

Culture

Thill, Scott. “June 21, 1948: Columbia’s Microgroove LP Makes Albums Sound Good.” Wired.com. http://www.wired.com/thisdayintech/2010/06/0621first-lp-released/. (accessed March 26, 2013).

Chunko, Mile. “RCA Victor Antique Record Player: July 1, 2008.” flikr.com. http://www.flickr.com/photos/24792039@N03/2625596446/. (accessed March 26, 2013).

Schmid, Rebecca. “‘MaerzMusik’ Pays Tribute to John Cage (March 21, 2012).” npr.com. http://www.npr.org/blogs/nprberlinblog/2012/03/21/149009188/maerzmusik-pays-tribute-to-john-cage. (accessed March 26, 2013).

Documentary Credits

Edison, Thomas A. “Edison with Cylinder Phonograph; Washington, DC: April 18, 1878.” 1878. Photo courtesy of U.S. Department of Interior, National Park Service, Edison National Historic Site. Posted by American’s Story, Library of Congress. http://www.americaslibrary.gov/aa/edison/aa_edison_phonograph_1_e.html (accessed March 12, 2013).

Edison, Thomas A. “Phonograph.” November 6, 1887. Photo courtesy of United States Patent and Trademark Office. Posted by Google Patents. http://www.google.com/patents?id=GKJrAAAAEBAJ&pg=PA1&dq=edison+phonograph&source=gbs_selected_pages&cad=1#v=onepage&q=edison%20phonograph&f=false (accessed April 8, 2013).

Edison, Thomas A. “Original Edison Tin Foil Phonograph.” Photo courtesy of U.S. Department of Interior, National Park Service, Edison National Historic Site. Posted by American Memory, Library of Congress. http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/edhtml/edcyldr.html (accessed April 8, 2013).

“Alexander Graham Bell.” Washington, D.C.: Harris & Ewing. Posted by American Memory, Library of Congress. http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/D?berl:1:./temp/~ammem_O6H7:: (accessed April 8, 2013).

Bell, Alexander Graham. “Reproducing Sounds From Phonograph Records.” November 18, 1885. Photo courtesy of United States Patent and Trademark Office. Posted by Google Patents. http://www.google.com/patents/US341212?printsec=drawing&dq=bell+tainter+phonograph&ei=FbxiUaSXBOvl4APUhoG4CA#v=onepage&q=bell%20tainter%20phonograph&f=false (accessed April 8, 2013).

Edison Brown Wax Cylinders.”Three minutes with the minstrels / Arthur Collins, S. H. Dudley and Ancient City.”1899. Photo courtesy of Department of Special Collections, Donald C. Davidson Library, University of California, Santa Barbara. http://cylinders.library.ucsb.edu/history-brownwax.php (accessed March 27, 2013).

“Emile Berliner.” Photo courtesy of Bains News Service. Posted by Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division. http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/ggb2006012853/ (accessed April 8, 2013).

Berliner, Emile. “Gramophone: specification forming parts of Letter Patent No. 372,786.” November 8, 1887. Created/published by Washington D.C. : United States Patent Office. Posted by American Memory, Library of Congress. http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/ampage?collId=berl&fileName=11010111//berl11010111.db&recNum=0&itemLink=r?ammem/berl:@field(NUMBER+@band(berl+11010111))&linkText=0 (accessed April 8, 2013).

Berliner Gramophone Co. “Advertisement of Berliner’s Gramophone.” 1895. Posted by American Memory, Library of Congress. http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/ampage?collId=berl&fileName=05000003//berl05000003.db&recNum=0&itemLink=r?ammem/berl:@field(NUMBER+@band(berl+05000003))&linkText=0 (accessed April 8, 2013).

“Emile Berliner in laboratory working on gramophone disc.” Photo courtesy of American Memory at the Library of Congress. Credit Line Rice Montreal.http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/Iberl:2:./temp/~ammem_OwHY::displayType=1:m856sd=berlp:m856sf=12010112:@@@mdb=magbell,berl,rbpebib,dag,papr,ngp,haybib,mmorse,ncpsbib,afcwip,wtc,wright (accessed March 25, 2013).

Wolters, Dick.”Record players matching the three types of records available in 1949.” Photo courtesy of Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.
http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2002716587/ (accessed March 27, 2013).

Invention

“Peter Carl Goldmark.” The Biography Channel website. http://www.biography.com/people/peter-goldmark-9314604 (accessed March 26, 2013).

Hume, Paul. “45-minute Record Means Great Savings.” The Washington Post, June 27, 1948. http://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.umw.edu/hnpwashingtonpost/docview/152055898/13D97A5456931A382D2/1?accountid=12299 (accessed April 22, 2013).

Henry, Libby. “Columbia LP record player.” March 22, 2013.

Possible Alternatives

St. John, Stephen. “You Ask, We Answer: Why Records Are 12 Inches Wide.” NPR, September 30, 20102. http://www.npr.org/blogs/therecord/2010/09/30/130242949/answering-your-questions-what-is-it-with-size (accessed April 2, 2013).

Ulabay, Neda. “Tale of the Tape: a Vintage Bob Marley Cassette.”  Photo courtesy of AFP/Getty Images. NPR, February 23, 2011. http://www.npr.org/blogs/therecord/2011/02/24/133995073/cassette-tapes-get-a-west-coast-rewind (accessed April 3, 2013).

Sin, Lauren. “A Reel-to-Reel Tape Player.” NPR, May 30, 2012. http://www.npr.org/blogs/thisisnpr/2012/05/30/153917107/a-sticky-situation-baking-the-tapes?sc=emaf (accessed April 2, 2013).

Wang, Oliver. “Purple Tapes.” NPR, September 20, 2012. http://www.npr.org/blogs/therecord/2012/09/19/161403938/the-purple-tape-only-built-4-collectors?sc=emaf (accessed April 2, 2013).

Tyrrell, Malcolm.”Audiocassette Tape.” Encyclopedia Britannica. http://www.britannica.com/bps/media-view/128718/1/0/0 (accessed April 2, 2013).

Kaplan, Fred. Back in the Groove: Jazz Reissues on Vinyl, (2010),New York Times, JPEG file, http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/08/arts/music/08jazz.html?pagewanted=all (accessed April 2, 2013).

Mueller-Kroll, Monika. “In Berlin, Expat Finds Inspiration for Live Music Series ‘m: Sountrack’.” NPR, February 11, 2011. http://www.npr.org/2011/02/09/133622786/in-berlin-expat-finds-inspiration-for-live-music-series-m-sountrack?sc=emaf (accessed April 2, 2013).

Preis, Siede. “Reel-To-Reel.” Photo courtesy of Getty Images. http://www.howstuffworks.com/question413.htm , (accessed March 27, 2013).

Crews, Andrew D. From Poulsen to Plastic: A Survey of Recordable Magnetic Media, University of Texas, 2003 https://www.ischool.utexas.edu/~cochinea/html-paper/a-crews-03-magnetic-media.html, (accessed March 25, 2013).

Morton, David.  Recording History. http://www.recording-history.org/HTML/8track5.php (accessed March 25, 2013).

Crews, Andrew D. From Poulsen to Plastic: A Survey of Recordable Magnetic Media, University of Texas, 2003. https://www.ischool.utexas.edu/~cochinea/html-paper/a-crews-03-magnetic-media.html, (accessed March 25, 2013).

Thank you so much to all of our documentary participants:

(In Order)

Gibran Parvez

Will Mackintosh

Iainne Johnson

Andrew Beichler

Meredith Mckee

Braden Vernet

Brittany Harris

Will Parrish

Lauren Braney

Karrith Mason

Maureen Iredell

Richard Hurley

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